Tag : Alejandro Anreus

thumbnail Nov 11

CARMEN HERRERA ON HER CENTENNIAL, a celebration of Carmen Herrera’s life and work, at The New School, New York

An event co-sponsored by Cuba Art NY (CANY)

Thursday, November 19, 2015

7 pm

THE NEW SCHOOL
68 5th Ave. (& 13th Street), NYC
Room UL-105

FREE ADMISSION
Space is limited.
RSVP at: cccofny@aol.com

A celebration of Carmen Herrera‘s life and work on her 100th birthday year. After a lifetime of anonymity, Carmen Herrera is today one of the world’s most collectible living artists. Our celebration will consist of three documentaries, each produced ten years apart: the shorts Artist in Exile (1994) and Five Degrees of Freedom (2005), and a clip from The 100 Years Show (2015). The films include an in-depth interview with Ms. Herrera, covering her life in Cuba, her marriage, her time in Paris, her development as an artist, her relative obscurity as a painter until her later years, and her life in New York City today, already as an internationally recognized artist.

Welcoming remarks by Aurora de Armendi, director of our Visual Arts Program. The screening will be followed by a commentary by the distinguished curator and art historian Alejandro Anreus, who will also entertain questions from the audience on Ms. Herrera’s career, her upcoming exhibits, and her continued contribution to Cuba’s cultural patrimony.

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thumbnail Sep 24

Lectures by Alejandro Anreus

CANY is proud to announce 2 lectures by Alejandro Anreus.

September 26, 2013  7 PM

Mario Carreño: The Early Years. Mario Carreño (1913 -1999) is one of the key artists of the second avant-garde generation in Cuban art. This lecture focuses on his early work from the late 1930s until 1943.

 September 27, 2013    7 PM

Antonia Eiriz In Context. Neo-figurative painter Antonia Eiriz (1929 -1995) is one of the most significant artists of her generation. Eiriz’s artwork is powerful and somber. Imbued with an audacious expression of angst, human suffering and social criticism, her imagery often connects to other great figures of the art world such as, Goya, Francis Bacon and Edward Munch. This lecture will present the main themes of her paintings in the socio-political context of her time, and relate it to her contemporaries in Latin America.

Cernuda Arte
3155 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables
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thumbnail Sep 9

Roberto Estopiñán: El Maestro a los 91, by Alejandro Anreus

In Spanish

From Cubaencuentro.com

A finales de la década del 40 y principios de los 50, apareció con gran fuerza la buena escultura moderna en la Isla de Cuba: Eugenio Rodríguez, López Dirube, Rolando Gutiérrez, Rodulfo Tardo, Núñez Booth, Roberto Estopiñán, Agustín Cárdenas y Tomas Oliva fueron sus creadores. Casi todos habían estudiado con Juan José Sicre en la academia de San Alejandro. Solo uno de estos escultores está vivo y sigue trabajando hoy en día con 91 años: Roberto Estopiñán. Él se queja de que su memoria le está fallando, que necesita de aparatos para oír, y que ya no puede recitar versos enteros de “La joven parca” de Valéry. Lo que no menciona es que todos los días hace un dibujo que comienza temprano y termina de noche, y que sigue tallando y modelando esculturas en escalas modestas.

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thumbnail May 8

Notas sobre el expresionismo en las plastica cubana

Article published in Cuba Encuentro in Spanish

By Alejandro Anreus

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thumbnail Dec 14

Memento Mori – book by Alejandro Anreus

In spanish

New book with poems by profesor and writer Alejandro Anreus  with drawings by Cuban American artistArturo Rodriguez.

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thumbnail Jul 8

Art in Depth, Explore the Art of Cuba – Newark Museum, NJ

Monday  07.18.2011  9:30 am–4 pm

Newark Museum

49 Washington Street,
Newark, NJ 07102-3176
973.596.6550
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thumbnail Mar 11

Demi

Salamatina Gallery Exhibit

February 4 to April 2

DEMI: Some Thoughts on her Work

Alejandro Anreus

Although I had seen DEMI’s work in reproduction for the past decade or so, a recent direct encounter with a substantial amount of her paintings and drawings has brought me to this sheet of paper and the thoughts that follow.

DEMI began painting in Spain in 1983. Her only technical orientation came from her husband, the painter Arturo Rodríguez. Since then she has developed a body of work whose vision is unique, and whose pictorial craft has become more complex and rich with time. Her recent solo show at Salamatina Gallery (Manhasset, NY) consisted of 16 large acrylic on canvas paintings and a small group of drawings in mixed media. This is the first time that the artist exhibits her graphic work; these drawings are simply marvelous. With coloring pencils, various pens, watercolor and ink, DEMI’s lines move across the paper from the subtle and delicate to the harsh and strong. These works are composed in an open and flexible manner, in them drawing becomes an adventure without dogmas, whose lyricism and freedom reminds us of the best of Paul Klee.

The canvases are large and layered, populated by those strange children of DEMI’s, who evoke ancient wise men and women, or outsiders that in reality are enlightened visionaries. Her work is not sentimental or kitschy, on the contrary. Within it there is an almost hallucinating resistant quality which is hard and tough. It dismantles sweet and simplistic visions of childhood. I dare say, without asking the artist, that her painting is profoundly spiritual. I see in the work a preoccupation with the space inhabited by human beings; that which exists between earth and the infinite, and depicts the sacramental relation between figure and environment. In a work such as One More Day on Earth, which is the title of her exhibition, we see a battle waged between the children of light and those of darkness. Innocence is the source of strength of these bald little girls, and it appears visualized as light, which becomes the weapon in the struggle against darkness. Two other extraordinary canvases dominate this consistently strong exhibition: Who is Afraid of the Big Black Bear and Black Angel. The first depicts children playing in a dark room while a large stuffed bear observes them from the rear of the composition. Painted in browns, ochre and pinks, the picture evokes mystery and uncertainty. The children stare at us and at the bear. They, us, we, sense the future terror of their world with the loss of innocence and arrival of experience.

Black Angel quite simply belongs in a museum. The painting is an icon of innocence surrounded by the infinite possibilities of the color white. The child evokes the salvific qualities of the child Jesus, and obviously also the African identity of much of Caribbean culture, into which as a Cuban, the artist was born. But beyond my limited iconographic interpretation, this work is just good painting with a capital P, where DEMI bets on the power of the pictorial surface and wins. What could have been a mannered and saccharine image is transformed into an icon of innocence as strength.

I reject the past comparisons between DEMI’s paintings and those of Frida Kahlo. Kahlo’s pictures are tortured and materialistic, while DEMI’s are spiritual and redemptive. She belongs to the family of visionaries such as England’s Richard Dadd or Mexico’s Jesús Reyes Ferreira. Like their worlds, hers is unique and it escapes comparison. We have to see it.

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