Tag : Felix Gonzalez-Torres

thumbnail Apr 3

Félix González-Torres and Tomás Sánchez in group show LONE TREE, at Marlborough Chelsea, NY

APRIL 4 – MAY 3, 2014

OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 6-8PM

MARLBOROUGH CHELSEA
545 West 25th Street
New York, NY 10001

Marlborough Chelsea is proud to present Lone Tree, a group exhibition of contemporary work inspired by Romanticism, the sublime and in particular the German painter Caspar David Friedrich.

“The artist’s feeling is his law. Genuine feeling can never be contrary to nature; it is always in harmony with her. But another person’s feelings should never be imposed on us as law. Spiritual affinity leads to similarity in work, but such affinity is something entirely different from mimicry.”

- Caspar David Friedrich

We have seen lately a significant resurrection of Romanticism in Contemporary Art. Developed in the late 18th – early 19th century as a reaction to the Industrial Revolution, early Romanticism challenged the pragmatic rationalization of science over the natural world, insisting instead on a philosophy of human emotion, sensitivity, and an expanded imagination of the sublime.
This exhibition is a starting point from which to explore how notions of the spiritual and the magical alongside the sublime and the romantic, have once again, become important as contemporary artists grapple with the rapid developments that are changing the world as we know it, right before our eyes.

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thumbnail Feb 16

Felix Gonzalez-Torres in group show Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection, at Grand Rapids Art Museum, MI

 February 2 – April 27, 2014

Grand Rapids Art Museum
101 Monroe Center NW
Grand Rapids, MI 49503
 

These are the bold, contemporary, and controversial artists who defined the art of our era. These artists took risks stylistically, thematically, conceptually, and pushed the very boundaries of art.

…..

Drawn from Emily Fisher Landau’s spectacular donation of over 400 modern and contemporary works of art to the Whitney Museum of American Art, this exhibition of 80 works traces the themes and ideas that have shaped art since the late 1960s—abstraction, conceptualism, postmodernism, questions about the relevance of painting in the aftermath of minimalism, debates about representation, “culture wars,” and a revived interest in personal narratives.

Legacy also illuminates the sociopolitical issues at the forefront of the 1980s downtown New York scene. Important works by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Robert Mapplethorpe, Peter Hujar, Nan Goldin, Keith Haring, David Wojnarowicz, and Lorna Simpson tackle tough subject matter, including AIDS, politics, and gender and race issues.

 

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thumbnail Sep 18

Princeton University Art Museum to Install Billboard Piece by Artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres

October 21 – December 16, 2013

Princeton University Art Museum

Princeton, NJ 08544

Everybody in, nobody out. That was the powerful call to action embodied in the work of Cuban-born American artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres (1957–1996), who was committed to expanding the public function of art in order to address universal themes of love, hope, loss and impermanence and to bring about social change. This fall the Princeton University Art Museum will install one of Gonzalez-Torres’s billboard-sized works in 12 locations: on the outdoor plaza in front of the Museum and on 11 commercial billboards located throughout greater Princeton and central New Jersey.

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thumbnail Jul 9

Imprints of Gonzalez-Torres’ search for eternity, Seoul, Korea

By Kwon Mee-yoo
Koreatimes.co.kr

Two round wall clocks, two rectangular mirrors and two pillows on an empty bed — the two identical shapes evoke a sense of similarity, but they can never be the same.

The first retrospective of Felix Gonzalez-Torres (1957-1996) in Asia, an artist who explored the fear of death and sought eternity, “Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Double” is going on show at Plateau in central Seoul.

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thumbnail Feb 15

This will Have been: Art, Love, & Politics in the 1980

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

February 11 to June 3, 2012

This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s covers the period from 1979 to 1992. During this era, the political sphere was dominated by the ideas of former US President Ronald Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, the music scene was transformed by punk and the birth of hip-hop, and our everyday lives were radically altered by a host of technological developments, from the Sony Walkman and the ATM to the appearance of MTV and the first personal computers. In the United States, the decade opened with an enormous anti-nuclear protest in New York’s Central Park and closed with mass demonstrations against the government’s slow response to the AIDS crisis. This exhibition attempts to make sense of what happened to the visual arts in the United States during this tumultuous period.

It includes the work of Cuban American Artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres

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thumbnail Jan 14

Felix Gonzalez-Torres in group show HIDE/SEEK: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture – Brooklyn Museum, New York

November 18, 2011–February 12, 2012
Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Floor

Brooklyn Museum

200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11238

The first major museum exhibition to focus on themes of gender and sexuality in modern American portraiture, HIDE/SEEK: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture brings together more than one hundred works in a wide range of media, including paintings, photographs, works on paper, film, and installation art. The exhibition charts the underdocumented role that sexual identity has played in the making of modern art, and highlights the contributions of gay and lesbian artists to American art. Beginning in the late nineteenth century with Thomas Eakins’ Realist paintings, HIDE/SEEK traces the often coded narrative of sexual desire in art produced throughout the early modern period and up to the present. The exhibition features pieces by canonical figures in American art—including George Bellows, Marsden Hartley, Alice Neel, and Berenice Abbott—along with works that openly assert gay and lesbian subjects in modern and contemporary art, by artists such as Jess Collins and Tee Corinne.

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thumbnail Nov 22

Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Allora & Calzadilla at Baltimore Museum of Art, MD

From artdaily.org

BALTIMORE, MD.- The Baltimore Museum of Art is reinstalling its contemporary art wing, which will open in fall 2012 launching a three-year, comprehensive renovation plan leading up to its 100th Anniversary in 2014. Known for its longtime commitment to collecting and supporting the work of living artists and acquiring works that speak to the events and innovations of our time, the BMA’s contemporary art wing features a significant collection of American art from the last six decades, including major late paintings by Andy Warhol, as well as works by Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Donald Judd, Glenn Ligon, Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, and Anne Truitt. The museum is also home to a remarkable collection of notable international artists, including Olafur Eliasson, Thomas Hirschhorn, Susan Philipsz, and Franz West.
Several new acquisitions will make their debut in the reinstalled wing, including A Man Screaming is Not a Dancing Bear by the artist collaborative Allora & Calzadilla, Untitled (bicycle shower) by Rirkrit Tiravanija, and Live Ball by Nari Ward.

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thumbnail Nov 18

Istanbul Biennial 2011 a resounding success

The 11th Istanbul biennial in 2009 was visited by 101,000 people. According to figures, this year’s biennial was the most successful yet. Curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Jens Hoffmann, the giant art event showed how similar human experiences constituted some of the most fundamental aspects of life. Central to the biennial was Cuban-American contemporary artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ works “Untitled” (Abstraction), “Untitled” (Ross), “Untitled” (Passport), “Untitled” (History), “Untitled” (Death With a Gun), which lent their names to five halls in the biennial venues Antrepo 3 and Antrepo 5 as each exhibition hall displayed “related” artworks.

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thumbnail Sep 9

Félix González-Torres in group show SEPTEMBER 11 at MoMA P.S.1, NY

September 11, 2011–January 9, 2012

MoMA PS1

22-25 Jackson Ave. at the intersection of 46th Ave.
Long Island City, NY 11101

MoMA PS1 website

The attacks of September 11, 2001 were among the most pictured disasters in history, yet they remain, a decade later, underrepresented in cultural discourse—particularly within the realm of contemporary art. Responding to these conditions, MoMA PS1 curator Peter Eleey brings together more than 70 works by 41 artists—many made prior to 9/11—to explore the attacks’ enduring and far-reaching resonance. Eschewing images of the event itself, as well as art made directly in response, the exhibition provides a subjective framework within which to reflect upon the attacks in New York and their aftermath, and explores the ways that they have altered how we see and experience the world in their wake. September 11 will open on the tenth anniversary of the attacks and occupy the entire second floor of the museum, with additional works located elsewhere in the building and in the surrounding neighborhood.

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thumbnail Aug 20

Felix Gonzalez Torres in group show GRANDES OBRAS MAESTRAS DEL SIGLO XX – Guatemala

Wednesday, August 24 7pm

Proyectos Ultravioleta

11 calle 5- 36B, z1
Ciudad de Guatemala, Guatemala

En facebook

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thumbnail Jun 2

Félix González-Torres, Ana Mendieta in group exhibit GLIMMER, at Colección Jumex, Mexico D.F.

April 8 – September 30, 2011

Colección Jumex

Via Morelos 272
Colonia Santa María Tulpetlac
Ecatepec, Estado de Mexico
C.P. 55400

Glimmer reclaims the ties between art and spirituality, art and ethics, art and human nature. Its pieces exemplify a desire to name and praise the intimate certainties of our daily lives. The exhibition features the work of artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Francis Alÿs, Cy Twombly, Ban Jas Ader, Félix González-Torres, Jim Hodges, Cerith Wyn Evans, Wolfgang Tillmans, Ann Hamilton, Andrés Carretero, Hreinn Fridfinnsson, Ana Mendieta, Douglas Gordon, Tomas Glassford, Salla Tykkä, Knut Asdam, and Arturo Herrera, among others.


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thumbnail May 12

Felix Gonzalez Torres in group show CONSTELLATIONS – Cornerhouse, UK

June 25 – September 11, 2011

Cornerhouse

70 Oxford St
Manchester M1 5NH, UK

Constellations presents a series of artworks that reflect impermanence, ephemerality and movement. At the core of the exhibition is the idea of a constellation not as something fixed, but an organic, evolving grouping with chaos and chance at its core. Each of the four artists featured in Constellations are interested in notions of fluidity and flux, with many of the works changing and evolving over time to create an exhibition that is different on each occasion it is seen. Together the works form a collection of ideas, which circulate and flow within an overall constellation.

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thumbnail Mar 21

Felix Gonzalez-Torres at MMK in Frankfurt- Specific Objects without Specific Form

Frankfurt
January, 29 – April 25, 2011

The MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main

A large candy mountain is exhibited at the Museum for Modern Art MMK in Frankfurt, Germany. About 300 kg of sweets form the artwork ‘Untitled (USA Today) 1990′ by Cuban-Born artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres. The museum dedicates a special exhibition to the artist who died in 1996. The retrospective ‘Specific Objects without Specific Form’ will be open for visitors until 25 April 2011. Candy Mountains are among his most famous works. Visitors are invited to try the sweets; their participation is an important aspect of the work. EPA/FRANK RUMPENHORST.

FRANKFURT.- The MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main hosts the final leg of the traveling retrospective, “Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Specific Objects without Specific Form”, previously shown at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre in Brussels and the Fondation Beyeler in Basel.

Including both rarely seen and more known paintings, sculptures, photographic works, and public projects, this major exhibition reflects the full scope of the Gonzalez-Torres’s short but prolific career. Born in Cuba, Gonzalez-Torres settled in New York in the late 1970s, where he studied art and began his practice as an artist before his untimely death of AIDS related complications in 1996, at the age of thirty-eight.

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